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Restored Indian Village home opens its doors for holiday tour

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Along with three other homes on the same block

This year’s Indian Village holiday home tour will include some residences familiar to loyal Curbed readers. The walking tour will visit four homes all on the same block—no need for a bus this year—including a 1912 Georgian Revival that’s been restored over the past year and a half.

Curbed recently visited this impressive home to capture the restoration.

1470 Iroquois was designed by William Buck Stratton for federal judge Alexis Angell, whose portrait sits in what was reportedly his favorite room, the study.

Curbed featured the home in 2017 when it was up for sale, and one of the notable features was its multiple Pewabic fireplaces—Stratton married Mary Chase Perry six years after the house was finished. The house fell into disrepair in the 1970s, and at one point someone decided to paint over some of the tiling. The previous owners stripped it off with toothbrushes, revealing the natural Pewabic beauty.

A guest bedroom with a blue Pewabic fireplace.
The dining room and its fireplace

The most noticeable changes came in the kitchen. In the butler’s pantry, cabinets sagged and were propped up by broomsticks.

The butler’s pantry looking into the kitchen before
The new butler’s pantry

The new owners took the old cupboards out, saved the doors, and replaced the bottom cabinets for a fresh new look. They also added stylish floor tiling and beautiful counter tops.

The kitchen itself was reconfigured, with a main wall taken out, a brick chimney exposed, and a once-laundry room now adding extra storage. The area now has room for a table and a large island, in addition to the new counters, fixtures, and appliances.

To note, the cabinets next to the laundry were kept and refinished.

The area to the left once had laundry.

All through the house, old bells, buzzers, and photos from the home’s history remain.

The third floor of the home was once unused space. Now, it has a lounge, bar area, and guest bedroom and bath.

Like many of these old mansions, one of the most beautiful rooms is the solarium. At one point, this one had windows covered in white paint. The historic windows have been restored, and now it’s a peaceful, plant-filled oasis.

In some rooms, the new owners just needed to refinish the floors or apply a coat of paint or wallpaper. Other rooms needed more extensive help. The powder room under the stairs had shag carpeting (explain that one). The ceiling in the dining room was dropped a few inches. The terrazzo floors in the foyer were ground down and refinished; it had previously looked like linoleum.

Two options are available for the Indian Village holiday home tour. A $125 VIP tour happens Friday, December 7. Guests will have a progressive dinner, with the main course, from new restaurant Marrow served at this home. The Christmas Walk happens Sunday, December 9. Guests can visit the homes at their own pace. Tickets are $40 and available here; proceeds benefit the Artelia Browne Court Scholarship Fund.

This bathroom once had shag carpeting.